Number of CT children living in poverty is on the rise - WFSB 3 Connecticut

Number of CT children living in poverty is on the rise

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HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) -

The number of Connecticut children living in poverty is on the rise according to a new study.

The annual Kids Count study took a look at the standard of living for children across the country.

Local officials called it a snapshot of the state's young people and an eye-opener. Their biggest concern is economics. Now, they're calling for changes in policy.

The study ranked Connecticut at seventh overall in child well-being.

"Overall what the data shows is that Connecticut kids are doing pretty well on many indicators and things have improved on many levels especially in the health, education, family and community," said Jim Horan, executive director of the CT Association for Human Services. "But not doing too well on economics."

The study took a look at how children were living. It focused on areas like health, education, family, community and economics.

It said that in the state:

  • 15 percent of children were living in poverty.
  • 37 percent were not attending preschool.
  • 7 percent of teens abuse alcohol and/or drugs.
  • 33 percent of children were living in single-parent homes.

"The one that we're most concerned about on economics is that the percentage of kids in poverty has actually increased by 50 percent since 1990," said Horan. "Right now 15 percent of kids are living in poverty compared to 10 percent in 1990. So that's a bad trend and we are concerned with what's being done policy-wise to improve that and how we can turn that around."

Nationally, the study found:

  • 23 percent of children were living in poverty.
  • 54 percent of children were not in preschool.
  • 6 percent of teens abuse alcohol and/or drugs.
  • 35 percent of children are in single-parent homes.

Researchers compared the data to 1990, which was the first year of the study. It did show improvement for the nation. Preschool attendance was up and mortality rates were falling.

They also looked back at recent years. Since 2005, children have seen gains in health and education, but setbacks in economics.

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