UConn researchers raise concerns over gun controllers for video - WFSB 3 Connecticut

UConn researchers raise concerns over gun controllers for video games

Posted: Updated:
UConn researchers raise concerns over gun controllers for video games (WFSB) UConn researchers raise concerns over gun controllers for video games (WFSB)
UConn researchers raise concerns over gun controllers for video games (WFSB) UConn researchers raise concerns over gun controllers for video games (WFSB)
STORRS, CT (WFSB) -

Parents may want to monitor how their children are playing their favorite video games.

According to a new study by the University of Connecticut, researchers have found what video game players use to play their games can make them more aggressive.

Over the last decade, gaming companies have created more realistic weapons like toy guns to make users feel part of the game.

Researchers said whether it is realized or not, it impacts how that user thinks.

Researchers studied 488 undergraduate students, and some were given a joystick and others were given toy guns and told to play a game where guns were used.

“People who played with the gun controller versus the traditional button and joystick controller had much higher levels of cognitive aggression or aggressive thoughts,” said Kirstie Farrar, a UConn researcher.

Researchers said gun-like controllers make the user fell more comfortable with how to aim and use a gun.

“If you're holding a controller you have to think of I press ‘X' to fire and then I hold down this trigger and it just feels very awkward. Whereas using an actual gun controller to use a gun in the game feels a lot more natural,” Farrar said.

Carlos Mesa said his son is a lot like other teenagers and spends a lot of time playing video games, but said he disagrees with what researchers found.

“I disagree with that. Just because you play sports and you have a baseball bat. There are plenty of people who you have been bludgeoned with bats, doesn't mean every kid that's holding a bat doesn't mean they're going to go out and do that,” Mesa said.

Researchers were quick to point out that even though the game impacts how users think, the study can't be used to predict if someone would become more violent.

“I wouldn't tell any parent what to decide but I do think parents should know that they're some effects from these controllers and then make the best decision for their family,” Farrar said.

It is unclear how long that aggressive behavior can last. Researchers said they are planning to release other findings as well.

For more information on the study, click here.

Copyright 2015 WFSB (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.