No tip policy a growing trend at U.S. restaurants - WFSB 3 Connecticut

No tip policy a growing trend at U.S. restaurants

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Dirty Candy in New York has a no tipping policy. (CBS photo) Dirty Candy in New York has a no tipping policy. (CBS photo)
NEW YORK CITY (CBS) -

A growing number of restaurants across the country are doing away with tips.

However, customers still have to pay for the service.

At the Dirty Candy restaurant in New York, people said they come for the vegetarian cuisine.

After questions about the food, however, chef-owner Amanda Cohen said customers often have another.

“They're like ‘so I don't have to tip?' and we're like ‘you don't have to tip,'” Cohen said.

Cohen said she did away with tipping. Instead, she charges customers a 20 percent administrative fee.

"I wanted to be able to pay everyone who works for me a living wage," she explained. “Minimum is $15 an hour [and] that includes our dishwasher."

In order to spread pay more evenly, Cohen decided to collect and distribute all of the money herself.

Servers like Jane Brendlinger said they can make up to $25 an hour.

"Right now I prefer the hourly just because you know how much you are going to get paid,” Brendlinger said. “It's a very fair wage."

Dirty Candy appears to be part of a growing trend of eateries adopting no tipping policies.

Establishments in cities nationwide have made similar moves. Some added a service charge to the bill while others, like Bar Marco in Pittsburgh, raised prices and adjusted the menu to pay employees more.

"We're going to standardize their pay so their pay will be the same every week," said Justin Steel, co-owner of Bar Marco.

Customers at the Dirt Candy said they weren't complaining. Many told reporters they were fine with it.

“I think everyone sort of wins,” one said.

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