Malloy looks to raise juvenile age of arrests to 20 - WFSB 3 Connecticut

Malloy looks to raise juvenile age of arrests to 20

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Malloy wants to raise the juvenile age for some arrested to 20. (WFSB) Malloy wants to raise the juvenile age for some arrested to 20. (WFSB)
HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) -

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy wants to raise the juvenile age for some arrested to 20 and lower bail.

On Thursday morning, Malloy released a series of proposals that are part of his Second Chance Society.

Malloy signed the second chance bill into law on July 9, 2015 that allows those convicted of drug offenses to have their penalties reduced from a felony to a misdemeanor. This bill only applies to non-violent offenders.

The bill is part of a plan to decrease crime rate and have less returning to prison.

“Criminal justice is evolving, and Connecticut should be at the forefront of implementing cutting-edge strategies.  These proposals would help break new ground.  If we want to tackle the cycle of crime and poverty, if we want to continue to drive crime down even lower, then we must change our approach to criminal justice with long-term solutions,” Malloy said in statement on Thursday.

Malloy added that there is no “one-size-fits-all attitude to corrections and expect further gains.”

“We cannot treat a low-risk young adult the same way we treat a career criminal.  The world is changing, and our approach to corrections should change with it,” Malloy said.

The governor said that prisons cannot serve as “crime schools.”

“If we are to truly be about corrections, and if we are to truly work towards ensuring that those housed in our prisons never return, then we need to be a Second Chance society that invests in permanent improvement and reformation instead of permanent punishment,” Malloy said.

Malloy argues that crime in Connecticut is down to “almost half-century lows” and dropping quicker “than in almost any other state.”    

“Recidivism is down.  Our prison population is down.  From our bail bonding system to our correctional strategy for young people, we need to change our criminal justice system so we can continue making Connecticut safer,” Malloy said.

Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman said the second chance bill is part of work “underway to make our communities safer, refocus at-risk youth, and put the systems in place to protect these and so many other gains.”

“Connecticut’s leadership on crime reduction and justice is significant, and so are the partnerships we continue to build with local government, advocates, and young people.  We are shaping a stronger future for all of our residents,” Wyman said in statement on Thursday.

To read more on the second chance proposals, click here

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