CT Audubon Society bans drones to protect its birds - WFSB 3 Connecticut

CT Audubon Society bans drones to protect its birds

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Connecticut Audubon Society is banning drones from their sanctuaries. (WFSB) Connecticut Audubon Society is banning drones from their sanctuaries. (WFSB)
FAIRFIELD, CT (WFSB) -

Connecticut Audubon Society is banning drones from their sanctuaries.

The ban is not just to keep the peace and quiet at the wildlife sanctuaries, but the Audubon Society officials said it’s also for the safety of the birds, who call this place home.

"We try and keep it as a natural state as possible,” Nelson North, of the Connecticut Audubon Society said.

That's why the Connecticut Audubon Society is banning the use of drones at its 19 wildlife sanctuaries, covering more than 2,600 acres across the state.

It feels the flying devices, which are gaining in popularity would not only annoy visitors, but more importantly disturb the wildlife. 

"One of the big things is any time you introduce something strange and different, you are going to stress the birds,” North said.

Audubon Society officials said if flown too close, drones could scare the birds, scattering them from their breading, resting and feeding grounds. The stress could cause them to drop eggs or break them.

Now, while the Audubon Society can keep drones off its property, the airspace is controlled by the Federal Aviation Administration.

If someone down the road is flying one, and sends it over its property, it would ask them to stop.  If that doesn't work, if would look to enforce federal laws, which prohibit the harassment of migratory birds.

"We want birds to come here and nest, to propagate and prosper and when you have drones and that sort of thing, with the noise, just the fact that they're in the air, the birds know they're there and that's going to upset the balance,” North said.

Audubon Society officials said it really hasn't had an issue with drones.

Eyewitness News was told one group asked to fly one on their property and was told no.

But because of the growing popularity of the devices, Audubon Society officials said it wants to be pro-active.

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