'Roadie' app pays people to deliver items - WFSB 3 Connecticut

'Roadie' app pays people to deliver items

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Roadie links up drivers who will be on the road anyway, with people who need something picked up or dropped off. (WFSB) Roadie links up drivers who will be on the road anyway, with people who need something picked up or dropped off. (WFSB)
HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) -

If you drive back and forth to work or school every day, you could turn that trip into making some extra cash.

A phone app is designed to do just that, and one Connecticut mom said she already signed up to be a “Roadie.”

"As a teacher, I don't have a lot of time to do things outside of teaching and being a mom,” said Chris Fazzina, who found a posting recently about the Roadie app on Facebook.

"You can pick a gig, if it works for you, you can bid on it and if the person picks you, you're notified,” Fazzina said.

The app is like Uber, but for your stuff. Roadie links up drivers who will be on the road anyway, with people who need something picked up or dropped off.

Fazzina said she had to verify her license, insurance, and registration to sign up as a driver.

Then, she found her first gig, which was grabbing a salon gift card for a husband who wanted to surprise his wife.

"It was something that was on my way, and I could do it pretty easily, and I was able to help somebody else out in the process and make a couple dollars,” she said.

Both the driver and the sender can rate each other, building the network on trust.

Of course, there are no gigs to pick up unless people use the app to send stuff.

Using the app, the first step to send something is to open the app and click on a plus sign that will be displayed. Then, the user clicks on “send something.” You can add a picture of the item, name it, give the value and described how big it is.

"It’s cool, I like it. Sometimes you're at the park with the kids and you need stuff picked up, then that's great,” said Tatiana Martinez of Wethersfield.

However, not everyone is sold on the app yet.

"I don't know if I would have much need for it, but it looks like it would be helpful for some people," said Dan Platt of Rocky Hill.

If you’re becoming a driver, internet safety expert Scott Driscoll said there are some things to keep in mind.

He said to try to meet the person for pick-up or drop-off in a public place, and ask questions about the item you will be transporting.

Roadie requires photos, but if you’re worried about whether the item is legal or safe, don’t sign up to carry it.

Fazzina said her first experience with Roadie was nothing but positive, and now she’s just hoping there will be more chances locally to do it again.

"You’re getting paid, but you're also doing a favor for someone and that sort of felt good,” she said.

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