Neighboring animal shelters unable to assist Hartford shelter - WFSB 3 Connecticut

Neighboring animal shelters unable to assist Hartford shelter

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Dogs at the Hartford Animal Shelter are running out of time and in need of adoption. (WFSB) Dogs at the Hartford Animal Shelter are running out of time and in need of adoption. (WFSB)
HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) -

The Hartford Animal Shelter is overrun with dogs needing homes and those dogs’ time is running out.

Since Eyewitness News broke this story on Monday, several Connecticut residents wanted to know why shelters from surrounding towns couldn't help out.  

One of the nearest shelters is dealing with a case of Parvovirus. That means no animals are coming in or out.

Kathy O'Sullivan was at the Hartford Animal Shelter on Thursday looking to adopt a dog.

“I'm devastated by it,” O'Sullivan said. “I've passed the word on to my friends.”

The Hartford shelter is seeing an influx of dogs and they're running out of space.

“There's 10 new dogs. It's ridiculous,” Sherry DeGenova with the Hartford Animal Control said. “We don't have room down here anymore, we're completely full.”

Officials said strays and abandoned dogs pop up each spring, but this year, it's exponentially worse.

“Running loose on the street, tied behind buildings and they're all owned at some point, half of these dogs have collars on,” DeGenova said. “Someone actually cared for these dogs at some point.”

But now, some of them just have days to live.

“If we don't find homes for these dogs, they're going to be euthanized,” DeGenova said.

Many people told Eyewitness News on social media that they want to know why other shelters can't step up.

Eyewitness News went to the Tyler Regional Animal Shelter in South Windsor. It serves that town as well as Manchester and East Hartford.

Officials at the Tyler Regional Animal Shelter said they can't help because they're dealing with a case of parvovirus. The disease that attacks animal tissue.

The dog affected had to be put down and right now, there's a temporary quarantine, so no dogs out and no dogs in.

“It's our job to ensure the safety of those animals that are currently in the pound and to make sure no dogs we collect in the future get ill,” South Windsor Police Deputy Chief Scott Custer said.

But even if the Tyler Regional Animal Shelter wasn't under quarantine, Custer said there's just no room for dogs from other cities. That's why lifesavers such as O'Sullivan are just so critical.

“If you give, they give back,” O'Sullivan said.

There is still time to adopt these dogs, so if you are interested click here.

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