CT lawmakers, police and health officials raise awareness of saf - WFSB 3 Connecticut

CT lawmakers, police and health officials raise awareness of safe haven laws

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Connecticut lawmakers, police and health officials raise awareness of safe haven laws. (WFSB) Connecticut lawmakers, police and health officials raise awareness of safe haven laws. (WFSB)
MERIDEN, CT (WFSB) -

Saving babies that's the goal behind a state law to help young mothers who may not want their newborn infants.

Connecticut has a safe haven law, which lets these mothers drop off their babies at a hospital within 30 days, with no questions asked. However, many said they are not aware of this law.

This law helped 27 young women, who have dropped off their babies at hospitals. The law was created 16 years ago.

“I couldn't for the life of me understand how a mother could abandon a baby,” retired Meriden Police Chief Robert Kosienski said.

It was a day Kosienski said he will never forget. As Meriden's police chief, one of his officers told him about a gruesome discovery off Evansville Avenue. A baby found wrapped in a blanket near a tree in a parking lot.

“He was in a pink blanket, frozen. It was below zero that day,” Kosienski said. “Thank god no animals came by and picked that baby up."

That was 28 years ago and they never found the mother. 

Connecticut didn't have a safe haven law then and the law created in 2000 gives young mothers a way out. If they change their minds, they have 30 days to do so.

Just two years ago, an East Hartford mother was desperate enough to leave her newborn in a trash dumpster.

"Our job as healthcare providers, nurses and physicians is to really provide that safe environment for a mom to feel comfortable coming to the emergency room and handing her baby to us,” Kate Sims with the Hartford Healthcare said.

There were events across the state on Monday including in Meriden where David Paul was found. They said they hope to bring more awareness to this law which has been a live safer for many babies.

"Children are growing up and as we teach them about crossing the street, how to drive,” former state lawmaker Pam Sawyer said. “We teach them a lot of laws. This is one of those laws we need to get in to the education process."

The challenge of this law is to educate young people. The plan is to work with school systems. 

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