Officials say budget cuts will impact schools, towns and cities - WFSB 3 Connecticut

Officials say budget cuts will impact schools, towns and cities

Posted: Updated:
A new online petition is hoping to raise awareness on how proposed state cuts could impact education in many towns and cities. (WFSB) A new online petition is hoping to raise awareness on how proposed state cuts could impact education in many towns and cities. (WFSB)
HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) -

A new online petition is hoping to raise awareness on how proposed state cuts could impact education in many towns and cities.

State Rep. Jesse MacLachlan started the petition, saying the cuts would negatively impact students and families.

The petition also said that the cuts would have a negative impact on local property taxes.

"This is simply a shift of the tax burden from the state level to the local level and all that's going to do is exacerbate the mass exodus from the state of Connecticut," said Old Lyme Superintendent Ian Neviaser.

Town officials had the chance to speak about the proposals on Wednesday morning in Clinton.

Gov. Dannel Malloy revealed his new budget plan on Tuesday afternoon, and it calls for huge cuts in social services, municipalities, and larger hospitals.

It also urges non-union state employees and elected officials to pay higher health care premiums.

The moves are all part of a plan to deal with a $900 million deficit.

The governor has proposed to reduce the state's Education Cost Savings grant to zero for 28 of the state's wealthiest districts.

For example, Waterford's nearly $1.5 million grant will be eliminated. A number of other districts will receive some money, but it will be a reduced amount.

Rocky Hill's would be reduced by nearly $900,000, and Wethersfield's would be reduced by $1.2 million.

Thirty lower performing districts, like New Haven and Waterbury, will receive their full funding.

"To make this kind of a swipe for communities, in particularly those who rely heavily on ECS monies at this late hour, is devastating to all of us," said Clinton School Superintendent Jack Cross.

Superintendents across the state are upset, saying even in tough times, education needs to be protected, not cut.

"Equal access to education isn't about everyone being treated the same. It's about everyone getting what they need," said Patricia Ciccone, who is the superintendent of schools in Westbrook.

So far, 350 state workers have received layoff notices, but that number could jump to 2,500.

The budget needs to be voted on and passed by May 4.

To see a list on how the cuts could could impact your town, click here.

Copyright 2016 WFSB (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.