Neighbors start petition after male swan killed in Danielson - WFSB 3 Connecticut

Neighbors start petition after male swan killed in Danielson

Posted: Updated:
Neighbors started a petition after a male swan was killed in Danielson last week. (WFSB) Neighbors started a petition after a male swan was killed in Danielson last week. (WFSB)
DANIELSON, CT (WFSB) -

Residents in Danielson are outraged after the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection killed a male swan last week.

The agency said it was something they had to do after receiving reports that it was being overly aggressive.

On Monday, the mother swan was on the river where her baby eggs once were.

“The swans have been here for at least 15 to 20 years, the male and the female and every year we witness the babies coming with them,” said Rick Ouellette of Danielson.

Neighbors like Bonnie Mayor aren’t buying what DEEP is saying.

“This is a part of nature. We invaded his space. He didn't do anything wrong. He wasn't a mean animal. He was protecting his nest," Mayo said, adding that she has been feeding the swans for years.

Swans mate for life and are known to protect their nest.

DEEP officials said it is something they had to do.

"We understand public concern about our euthanization of the swan and we appreciate just how much this state's wildlife means to people.  As Connecticut's environmental agency, DEEP also values wildlife and our Wildlife staff works hard to safeguard and encourage the remarkable diversity of wildlife enjoyed here. Unfortunately there are occasionally circumstances when we need to euthanize an animal to protect public safety."

The neighborhood has started the online petitions and they want this investigated. To check out the petition, click here.

They also want DEEP to look into other options, like putting up signage instead of killing the wild birds.

DEEP Wildlife Staff euthanized a swan in Eastern Connecticut the morning of Wednesday, April 2).

*    On Monday, April 18, DEEP received reports of a male swan in the Five Mile River near Danielson acting aggressively toward humans - as swans sometimes do.

*    The report established that the swan attacked two adults in kayaks on Sunday, April 17.  The kayakers were able to fend the swan off with their paddles before getting off the water.  We also had reports that the swan subsequently attacked two people in a canoe. In this second incident, the swan was a contributing factor that led to the overturning of a canoe with its two occupants.  The canoeists were pulled from the cold water by a passing angler. 
*    After assessing this situation and talking to some of the people involved, DEEP staff went to the area on Wednesday, April 20, captured the male swan, and euthanized it.
We understand public concern about our euthanization of the swan and we appreciate just how much this state's wildlife means to people.  As Connecticut's environmental agency, DEEP also values wildlife and our Wildlife staff works hard to safeguard and encourage the remarkable diversity of wildlife enjoyed here.
Unfortunately there are occasionally circumstances when we need to euthanize an animal to protect public safety.  Those are difficult judgments for us to make, but we believe such action was necessary in the case of this swan.
In response to a few specific issues being raised we are providing the following information:

*    The technique used to euthanize the swan is technically known as cervical dislocation.  It is considered by wildlife experts to be a humane practice and it is endorsed by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA).  

*    It is NOT a good practice to relocate wild animals that have displayed aggressive behavior.  Doing so only moves the dangers posed by the animal from one location to another.  It would also NOT have been a sound decision to try and relocate the female and the nest because it is unlikely the female would have stayed with the nest or successfully hatched the eggs it contained.

*    DEEP staff did "addle" the eggs in the nest to prevent them from hatching.  This was done in a careful manner so that the female swan will still attempt to hatch them instead of seeking to lay new eggs.  The decision was made to "addle" the eggs to prevent a new generation and more swans from maturing in an area where there is obviously the potential for conflict with humans.

Copyright 2016 WFSB (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.