Gov. continues to push second chance initiative - WFSB 3 Connecticut

Gov. continues to push second chance initiative

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Gov. Dannel Malloy discussed his Second Chance 2.0 initiative at the Hartford Public Library Monday morning. (WFSB photo) Gov. Dannel Malloy discussed his Second Chance 2.0 initiative at the Hartford Public Library Monday morning. (WFSB photo)
HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) -

Connecticut's governor continued his push for a proposal to give certain criminals a second chance in society.

Gov. Dannel Malloy held a roundtable discussion to discuss his "Second Chance 2.0" initiatives.

He held the discussion despite inaction by lawmakers.

"It's hard to turn your city around if a substantial portion of your population doesn't qualify for housing, jobs or a student loan," Malloy said.

The proposal is aimed at reducing the state's crime rate, which Malloy said was already "historically low," while helping nonviolent former offenders successfully reintegrate into society.

It also raises the age, allowing those 18 to 20 to be treated more like juveniles.

"To say criminals 18 to 20 are not responsible for their actions but yet they can sit on a jury, seems disingenuous to the notion that they are unable to comprehend the difference between right and wrong," said Senate Minority Leader Len Fasano.

The discussion took place at the Kitchen Cafe at Hartford Public Library in Main Street at 10:30 a.m.

At the roundtable, ex-offenders talked about how a criminal record prevents people from getting jobs.

Bashaun Brown spent six years in prison for robberies, and he's now working with other ex-offenders to help them start their own businesses.

"The longer you wait - the more things you lose and for the teenagers that are getting longer, the longer they are in prison the more susceptible they are to bad influences," Brown said.

There are a few Connecticut businesses that will hire former inmates, and one of them is the Hartford Public Library.

"We as a country and a society have made enormous mistakes in our criminal justice system -- and our over reliance on incarceration," Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin said.

Malloy was joined by Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin, Department of Correction deputy commissioner Monica Rinaldi, ex-offenders and other criminal justice advocates.

The bill has seen its share of opposition, including from Beth Chapman, wife of television star Dog the Bounty Hunter.

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