Victims of crumbling foundation epidemic question local leaders - WFSB 3 Connecticut

Victims of crumbling foundation epidemic question local leaders

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Homeowners hoped to get answers about their crumbling foundations at a public meeting in South Windsor Wednesday night. (WFSB photo) Homeowners hoped to get answers about their crumbling foundations at a public meeting in South Windsor Wednesday night. (WFSB photo)
SOUTH WINDSOR, CT (WFSB) -

Victims of a crumbling foundation epidemic peppered local and state leaders with questions during a passionate public meeting in South Windsor on Wednesday night.

Lawmakers told them that help is on the way.

As more time passes, however, the homeowners said they're becoming increasingly desperate. Some said they feel like their future is crumbling along with their foundations.

The victims said they all go through the same cycle. They notice cracks in their basement walls then learn repairs could cost a $250,000. They get scared and then come to public meetings like the one held Wednesday night.

"There's really no solution," said Gary Efronson of South Windsor. "In my view, we're at a very early stage right now."

The state said it believes a Stafford Springs quarry provided tainted concrete material that's been used in hundreds, perhaps thousands, of houses. So far, homeowners like Efronson said they've been left holding the bag.

"The biggest thing is it will have an impact on my retirement," he said. "That's the biggest thing."

At Wednesday night's meeting, state leaders gave victims the information about their investigation.

However, lawmakers wanted homeowners to know that it could be a long time before they are made whole.

"There are unfortunately a lot of people who are still thinking that someone's going to come forward with a check for $150 to $200,000, hand them the check and their problems are gonna go away," said Rep. Bill Aman, a Republican representing South Windsor.

Aman said he doesn't want victims to get false hope. He said two proposals he hears often, like relief from FEMA or a state law requiring insurance companies to pay, are simply unrealistic.

"That would be very misleading for folks to believe that that's going to happen," he said.

Still, legislators said they're still working hard to find a solution. They said it just won't happen anytime soon.

Until then, the same cycle will continue.

"We're all victims," said Gary Boudle of South Windsor. "I see the degradation of community as people move away."

The Department of Consumer Protection said it is also investigating the issue. It's findings are slated to be released this fall.

Copyright 2016 WFSB (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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