Malloy, state police open up about state's climate after recent - WFSB 3 Connecticut

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Malloy, state police open up about state's climate after recent violence

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Channel 3's Erin Connolly conducted an exclusive interview with Gov. Dannel Malloy and State Trooper Tyler Weerden following recent violence. (WFSB) Channel 3's Erin Connolly conducted an exclusive interview with Gov. Dannel Malloy and State Trooper Tyler Weerden following recent violence. (WFSB)
HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) -

It has been a tragic few weeks across the country, and Gov. Dannel Malloy spoke exclusively to Channel 3 about everything, from the Orlando massacre, alleged police misconduct in two states, and the devastation in Dallas.

"This has been a tough week,” Malloy said.

During a drive through the city of Hartford, Malloy and CT State Police Trooper Tyler Weerden discussed the deaths of Alton Sperling and Philando Castile, two black men who were killed last week by police.

The governor said what sets Connecticut apart from states that have seen possible misconduct is Connecticut’s police forces relationships with the community, and lengthy training.

"There are places in America where people are certified to be police officers with as little as 45, 50 hours of training and that's one of the big differences between a state like Connecticut, where we have very high standards for not only our troopers but local police departments,” Malloy said.

"If we train constantly about use of force and know the case law that dictates what we can do, when a situation happens quickly, you're going to be able to react quicker and more accurately,” Weerden said.

Malloy said proper training is another reason why crime in Connecticut is at a 48-year low, but he said there is still work to do.

"Here in Hartford and in Connecticut, we are seeing a drop in crime, but in our major urban areas we still see a disproportionate concentration of crime,” Malloy said.

In the wake of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, Connecticut passed some of the toughest gun laws in the nation, including a ban on the sale of assault weapons.

Now, in the wake of recent shootings in Orlando and Dallas, Malloy said he hopes other states follow suit.

"They really are military weapons. They weren't even sold in the United States legally until 2004 and since 2004 are responsible for the largest numbers of deaths in mass casualty shootings that we've had,” Malloy said.

During the interview, Malloy spoke about his recent trip to Orlando following the mass shooting at Pulse nightclub, which killed 49 people.

"It was moving. It certainly brought back memories of our own mass shooting at Sandy Hook school,” Malloy said.

ISIS claimed responsibility for the horrific attack in Orlando, and is also believed to be involved in the bombings of Istanbul’s main airport.

With the terror group showing no signs of stopping, Malloy said law enforcement has stepped up its efforts in Connecticut, especially at train stations and airports.

"We're also taking a look at making sure they're appropriate levels of security at other large public albeit private events, concerts and alike,” Malloy said.

With mass shootings on the rise, police in Connecticut are also looking for ways to better protect themselves.

"A lot of troopers and local officers have gone and started buying their own rifle inserts that will go inside your vests and will stop larger rounds, just due to the fact that a lot of the criminals now have more high powered weapons,” Weerden said.

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