Intense heat and drought threatens growth of Christmas Trees - WFSB 3 Connecticut

Intense heat and drought threatens growth of Christmas Trees

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Rain usually helps those Christmas trees grow at farms such as Angevine in Warren, but this summer, that isn’t the case. (WFSB) Rain usually helps those Christmas trees grow at farms such as Angevine in Warren, but this summer, that isn’t the case. (WFSB)
WARREN, CT (WFSB) -

You may not be thinking about Christmas quite yet, but tree growers are panicking—worrying about the damage this intense summer heat and drought is doing to their trees.

In the Northeast, rain usually helps those Christmas trees grow at farms such as Angevine in Warren, but this summer, that isn’t the case.

The farm planted thousands of small trees in the spring, and now intense heat and dry weather have scorched some beyond repair.

“Some years we've had less than 1% you have a perfect season this year is going to be different for sure,” said Timothy Angevine, the Angevine Farm Manager.

Angevine says so far the farm has gotten about one-fourth the amount of rain it gets in a typical season. 

They won’t know until a little later in the season what the total damage will be, but Angevine said it could cost his business $5,000 and force them to double the planting next year.

There are similar problems at Spruce Hill Farm in Thomaston. 

It takes eight to 12 years for a Christmas tree to mature, so these dying trees won’t impact consumers this year, but it will when the trees in this crop reach maturity.

Experts say when shopping for a tree you can give them a quick test to see if the tree was affected by a past drought. They say to run your hand down the branch to make sure you don’t see needle loss.

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