Teaching positions could be cut in Hartford's school budget - WFSB 3 Connecticut

Teaching positions could be cut in Hartford's school budget

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Teaching positions could be cut in Hartford's school budget  (WFSB) Teaching positions could be cut in Hartford's school budget (WFSB)
HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) -

With the budget looking bleak, hundreds of teaching jobs may be on the chopping block in Hartford.

The teacher's union said that bombshell was dropped on them on Tuesday and they are not standing for it. 

The Hartford Federation of Teachers told Eyewitness News they were warned of the possibility of cuts of 200 teachers.

“Education is something that is totally necessary right now,” Nichole Kane, a Hartford parent. “I don't see how that's a better solution for the situation we're in.”

In a statement to Eyewitness News, the Hartford School System writes, "The challenges we face as a district are real. However, the exact impact on staff or schools remains to be determined. It will be available once the district’s budget and engagement process is complete and shared with the Board. The Superintendent’s Recommended Budget is expected to be presented on April 18. "

The Teacher's Union told Eyewitness News the district blamed the possibility of these deep cuts on the bleak statewide budget outlook. 

The union said they were blindsided, because they say they conceded a lot last year, when 29 teachers were let go. The union also said they decided not to negotiate a new contract for the next two years, meaning teachers would not see raises. 

The union objects to the cuts, saying they can't happen because losing 200 teachers would bring class sizes over the maximum allowed.

Right now, classes are to be no bigger than 28 in high school and 23 in kindergarten, 1st and 2nd grades.

“What are the children going to learn if you're cutting 200 teachers? They're not going to get the proper education. It's bad enough out here. It's crazy,” says Jennifer Lopez, a Hartford parent.

Parents were siding with the teachers for their kids’ sake. Some said they were even thinking of moving.

“That makes me feel like that city is not taking education seriously,” Kane said. 

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