CT AG joins other states in lawsuit against president's travel b - WFSB 3 Connecticut

CT AG joins other states in lawsuit against president's travel ban

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Attorney General George Jepsen has joined with other states in a lawsuit against the president's executive order. (WFSB file photo) Attorney General George Jepsen has joined with other states in a lawsuit against the president's executive order. (WFSB file photo)
HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) -

The Connecticut attorney general has joined with other states in a lawsuit against the president's executive order. 

Attorney General George Jepsen said Connecticut is joining with 15 other states as they ask a "federal appeals court to leave in place a temporary restraining order issued by the federal District Court in Seattle that has halted President Donald Trump's executive order barring individuals from seven majority-Muslim countries from entering the United States." 

The states besides Connecticut involved in Monday's brief are California, Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia and the District of Columbia. 

These 16 attorney generals are arguing for a stay of the order "would cause concrete, immediate and irreparable harms to the states, notably their colleges and universities, medical institutions and tax revenues." They added that it would also "harm the ability of states to ensure the health, welfare and civil rights of their residents."

Jepsen said he and the other attorney generals "believe that the president has exceeded his constitutional authority in issuing this executive order."

"The state of Connecticut and, indeed, states across our country cannot and should not have to bear the confusion, cost and economic loss caused by this unconstitutional executive order. We are asking the court today to uphold the restraining order obtained by the Washington and Minnesota attorneys general late last week and to allow individuals from these seven countries – who already face significant vetting procedures prior to the granting of access to the United States – to continue to travel on their properly issued visas while this case is further litigated," Jepsen said in a statement on Monday. 

The 16 attorney generals said their states have been "harmed by this executive order and the federal government's shifting implementation of it."

"The District Court's temporary restraining order returned the policies and procedures regarding travel to the United States to the status quo that existed before the executive order…If this court were to grant a stay at this juncture it would resurrect the chaos experienced in our airports beginning on the weekend of January 28 and 29, and cause harm to the states – including state institutions such public universities, to the businesses that sustain our economies, and to our residents," the 16 attorney generals said on Monday. 

To read the full multistate amicus brief, click here

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