Humpback whale spotted near Westport, Norwalk - WFSB 3 Connecticut

Humpback whale spotted near Westport, Norwalk

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A whale was spotted near Westport and Norwalk on Friday (Norwalk PD) A whale was spotted near Westport and Norwalk on Friday (Norwalk PD)
WESTPORT, CT (WFSB) -

Westport police’s Marine Unit spotted a humpback whale in Long Island Sound on Friday morning.

Officers received calls about the whale near Cockenoe Island. They posted a video on their Facebook page.

Norwalk police also posted video of the whale, taken by crews aboard the police marine boat.

After not being in Connecticut waters for 100 years, we're told this is now the third straight year a humpback whale has been spotted in the sound.  

Those at the Norwalk Maritime Aquarium want those out on the water to enjoy these magnificent creatures, but also remember to keep your distance.

"Boaters are not used to dealing with big 60 foot animals in the western end of Long Island sound, so we want them to be aware, these animals are out there, they may sometimes breach, they're certainly going to come up for air,” said Dave Sigworth, of Norwalk Maritime Aquarium.

Experts said while it’s quite a sight, the huge creatures can’t be taken lightly.

Whales fall under the Federal Marine Mammal Protection Act, so you’re not supposed to get any closer than 100 feet.

If you see one, don’t chase it.

"We want you to cut your engine, drop your sails, just coast, get your camera out, film it, photograph it, and enjoy it, but please don't get too close to it,” Sigworth said.

The likely reason the humpback whales are seen in the western end of Long Island Sound is food.

“There are a lot of bait fish, smaller food fish in the sound, the last couple of summers and we think that's what drawing them in and also keeping them around,” Sigworth said.

Westport police said they made sure the whale was not in distress and kept a safe perimeter around him until he swam into deeper waters.

The likely reason the humpback whales are seen in the western end of Long Island Sound is food.

“There are lot of bait fish, smaller food fish in the sound, the last couple of summers and we think that's what drawing them in and also keeping them around,” Sigworth said.

If you see the whale and are able to snap pictures or take video, the folks at the Maritime Aquarium, want to hear from you.  You can report the sighting to John Lenzycki and Dave Hudson at the Maritime Aquarium: jlenzycki@maritimeaquarium.org and dhudson@maritimeaquarium.org.

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