Viewing of partial solar eclipse in CT ends - WFSB 3 Connecticut

SOLAR ECLIPSE

Viewing of partial solar eclipse in CT ends

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The partial solar eclipse has peaked. This is a shot from the Connecticut Science Center in Hartford. (WFSB) The partial solar eclipse has peaked. This is a shot from the Connecticut Science Center in Hartford. (WFSB)
People can view the Eclipse 2017 from CT Science Center from the back of our WFSB Weather Tracker! (WFSB) People can view the Eclipse 2017 from CT Science Center from the back of our WFSB Weather Tracker! (WFSB)
People are getting ready at the Glastonbury-East Hartford Magnet School. (WFSB) People are getting ready at the Glastonbury-East Hartford Magnet School. (WFSB)
Lines outside of the Welles Turner Memorial Library in Glastonbury on Monday afternoon. (WFSB) Lines outside of the Welles Turner Memorial Library in Glastonbury on Monday afternoon. (WFSB)
HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) -

Millions of people across the country including in Connecticut saw the eclipse on Monday. 

While Connecticut wasn't able to see all of it, parts of the country got to experience a total solar eclipse on Monday. However, viewers in Connecticut got to see about 70 percent of it on Monday afternoon. 

"We're only going to see the sun be covered by about 67 percent, so we won't see a total eclipse, but it should still be pretty spectacular," said Andrew Fotta, Connecticut Science Center.

Think you know everything about the eclipse? Guess again. Take our trivia challenge here

Even though it was only a partial solar eclipse, people still needed special glasses to allow them to safely view the astronomical event on Monday afternoon.

Doctors and astronomers said looking at the sun could cause serious damage.

Looking through the cell phone camera won't be any better. If customers don't get any glasses or solar filters for their cameras, they can simply take a look through one of the Science Center's telescopes.

NASA also showed people how to make a DIY eclipse viewer.

To see the full NASA video, click here

Astronomers said this was the first solar eclipse to sweep coast-to-coast in 99 years. The last time this happened was in 1918. This year's event will be the first total solar eclipse visible from the continuous U.S. since 1979. They said the main drag stretched from Oregon to South Carolina.

During the solar eclipse, there was a drop in temperature.

"During the eclipse itself, the supply of solar radiation will be greatly reduced," Channel 3 Meteorologist Scot Haney said. "As the sky darkens, we will likely notice a cool off into – perhaps 70s – close to the peak at around 2:45 PM. Once there is closer to full sun, temperatures will buoy back."

"The eclipse will begin around 1:25 p.m., peak at roughly 2:45 p.m. and finish up at around 4 p.m.," Haney said.

The next total solar eclipse will be visible in the U.S. in April of 2024.

Many people scrambling to get their hands on the special glasses before Monday afternoon. The Connecticut Science Center in Hartford handed them out as part of a solar eclipse kit to the first 500 people who pay to get into its event.

To see photos of the eclipse from viewers on your mobile device, click here.

Cora J. Belden Library in Rocky Hill was one of 13 businesses that applied for a grant in May. The Cora J. Belden Library advertised it and those interested needed to sign up ahead of time. They gave out 1,000 solar eclipse glasses at the amphitheater in town. 

"I thought to myself, that's a lot of glasses, but I really want to get them for Rocky Hill," Catherine Potter, who is the children's librarian at Cora Belden Library, said. "So I said let's go for it." 

The response was overwhelming. 

"It just became eclipse mania and everyone was looking for glasses. Everyone was looking for glasses. Everyone was calling," Potter said. "We had phone calls coming out of the woodwork and by 11 a.m. Wednesday morning of last week all of our glasses were gone." 

Many parents told Eyewitness News they took the day off to watch this with their children.

"It's exciting. We view it as a learning opportunity teach them about science and getting started at a young age," Rashsaan Baskerville, of Middletown, said.  

Russell Library in Middletown also gave away pairs. Their line was out the door on Monday morning. Over in Glastonbury, people were sitting on the lawn at the Glastonbury Public Library waiting to get their eyewear. They gave out 120 pairs. 

"I wanted to see the solar eclipse and you can't look at it until you have the glasses," Karen Stoll, of Glastonbury, said. 

Glastonbury-East Hartford Magnet School in Glastonbury hosted an event for the partial solar eclipse and handed out 800 solar eclipse glasses. The CREC school has a planetarium and put on a presentation to educate people about a solar eclipse. 

"Something I wasn't expecting. We have over 700 people to observe and the eclipse," Planetarium Coordinator Jason Archer said. 

There was also a solar telescope set up at the planetarium at Glastonbury-East Hartford Magnet School. People could look through it without protective glasses. 

Both the Children's Museum in West Hartford and an observatory at Wesleyan University in Middletown had telescopes aimed at the eclipse. The John J. McCarthy Observatory in New Milford hosted a viewing party on Monday afternoon.

The Connecticut Open, New Haven’s premier sporting event, took place during the partial eclipse and used the event to showcase its athletes. 

For more on events and other Eclipse-related stories, check out the special section on WFSB.com here.

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