Teal pumpkins used to mark houses with allergy-free treats - WFSB 3 Connecticut

Teal pumpkins used to mark houses with allergy-free treats

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Teal pumpkins are trying to make trick-or-treating less tricky for kids with food allergies. (WFSB) Teal pumpkins are trying to make trick-or-treating less tricky for kids with food allergies. (WFSB)
TOLLAND, CT (WFSB) -

More and more teal pumpkins are popping up on front porches including in Connecticut.

This nationwide effort is trying to make trick-or-treating less tricky for kids with food allergies.

Channel 3 talked with a local family in Tolland on why they got involved in the new annual tradition.

The teal pumpkin is not just a decoration but a sign welcoming kids with allergies for a safe treat.

“Halloween is one of my favorite holidays,” 16-year-old Emily Fritsch, of Tolland, said. 

But, last year it was a disappointing Halloween for Fritsch who developed food allergies.

“Last year, I couldn't have any of the candy,” Fritsch said. “So, that was not fun it's like the best part.”

Fritsch said she is now gluten and dairy free. Her headaches and stomach aches are now gone.

“I can’t have any candies with cookies in them and a lot of Hershey's chocolate had gluten in it too so it's not fun,” Fritsch said. 

About one in 13 children has a food allergy. So that got her mom Leeann thinking outside the box this Halloween.

After a little research, she found the teal pumpkin project. It is a national campaign with food allergy research and education to have treats that are safe for kids with allergies like her daughter.

“Like Frankenstein bubbles and skull necklaces glow in the dark bracelets for the little ones,” Leeann Fritsch said. “I even found candies that are gluten free as well.” 

Families can register their homes on the teal pumpkin project website so trick-or-treaters with allergies can find them.  

“For the younger children, especially who can't go out and have candy like the other kids can, I thought it was a really good idea so they wouldn't feel left out or anything,” Emily Fritsch said. 

Allergy specialists said to be very careful with reading labels. The smaller candy bars can actually contain different ingredients than the regular sized bars.

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