Lawmakers push for GPS devices to protect sex assault victims - WFSB 3 Connecticut

Lawmakers push for GPS devices to protect sex assault victims

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Jordan Ledyard testified on Friday, telling state lawmakers how GPS devices can protect victims. (WFSB) Jordan Ledyard testified on Friday, telling state lawmakers how GPS devices can protect victims. (WFSB)
HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) -

A young woman from Clinton is sharing her story of sexual abuse to help others.

Jordan Ledyard testified on Friday, telling state lawmakers how GPS devices can protect victims.

She supports a bill that would make those convicted of sexual assault pay for these devices.

"I suffered years of sexual abuse and since the beginning of a long two-year process. I felt all the rights were for the defendant and not myself,” Ledyard said.

She is now a college student, but she was a young teen when the sexual abuse started.

"I am strongly opposed to offenders have months to get their affairs in order and leaving victims feeling unsafe and vulnerable,” Ledyard said.

She told lawmakers on the judiciary committee how after being convicted, her attacker was out on bond awaiting sentencing when he escaped.

"Senate bill 239 would require those convicted of sexual assault to pay for their own GPS monitoring while they await sentencing,” said Republican State Senator Art Linares.

GPS devices are very helpful. They monitor where a person is and can alert police if they come near the victim.

They are also expensive at about $1,000.

"If you have an individual that's been convicted of sexual assault who is a client of public defender’s office and is deemed indigent and can't afford to pay the cost, how do you deal with that situation,” said Democratic State Rep. Steven Stafstrom.

That's a question some are asking, what happens if those convicted can't pay for GPS.

"It does cost a little bit of money and it will be expensive to put this GPS monitoring system on these assailants, but I think its money well spent and if we can make assailant pay for it maybe through bail bonds, or their own pocket,” Linares said.

Wherever the money comes from, Ledyard hopes lawmakers will understand how important GPS devices are.

"The pain I experienced I don't want anyone to feel that and knowing someone is out there that could be potentially detrimental to you is not a comfortable feeling and I don't want anyone else to feel that way,” Ledyard said.

Lawmakers thanked Ledyard for being brave enough to testify.

The committee now has to vote on this before it goes to the Senate for a full vote.

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