Sen. Joe Markley tapped for lieutenant governor - WFSB 3 Connecticut

Sen. Joe Markley tapped for lieutenant governor

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MASHANTUCKET, CT (AP) -

The Latest on Connecticut Republicans' convention (all times local):

8:15 p.m.

Connecticut Republicans have endorsed Southington state Sen. Joe Markley as the party's lieutenant governor candidate, but he faces a likely August primary.

Markley won more than 53 percent of the delegate support at Saturday's state Republican convention at Foxwoods Resort Casino.

Both New Britain Mayor Erin Stewart and Darien First Selectman Jayme Stevenson received enough support to qualify for the primary.

Markley has served two stints in the Connecticut General Assembly. The first was in 1984, when he served two years in the state Senate. Markley returned in 2010 and has been an outspoken fiscal conservative.

At Saturday's convention, he spoke of the importance of working together to elect Republicans in November.

Stewart was a newcomer to the race. Formerly a gubernatorial candidate, she switched to lieutenant governor on Friday.

7 p.m.

Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton has narrowly won the Republican endorsement for governor.

The endorsement came after three rounds of voting, numerous vote switches and a feisty debate over whether to close the ballot at Saturday's GOP state convention.

The former high school teacher finally was pronounced the party's candidate after securing just over 50 percent of the vote. He was followed by former First Selectman Tim Herbst with about 41 percent and Westport businessman Steve Obsitnik with 9 percent. All three qualified to participate in the Aug. 14 primary.

Boughton has run for governor twice before, but this marks the first time he has received the party's endorsement.

He vowed to earn the votes of Republicans, whether they supported him Saturday or not, saying "now is the time for Republican leadership and for Republican values."

5:30 p.m.

Connecticut Republicans are now on a third round of balloting, as they work to endorse a candidate for governor.

Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton continues to have a slight lead, winning 36 percent of the votes following the second round of voting Saturday during the state GOP convention at Foxwoods Resort Casino. He's trailed by former Trumbull First Selectman Tim Herbst with 28 percent and Westport businessman Steve Obsitnik with 17 percent.

Three more candidates - Fairfield attorney Peter Lumaj, Shelton Mayor Mark Lauretti and former U.S. Comptroller David Walker of Bridgeport - didn't receive enough support to progress to the third round.

Ultimately, anyone who wins over 15 percent of the delegates will be qualified to participate in the Aug. 14 primary.

Candidates also can petition their way onto the primary ballot.

4 p.m.

Connecticut Republicans are on their second round of voting, as they work toward endorsing a candidate for governor.

Danbury Mayor Mark Bougton was in the lead following the first delegate count, winning nearly 25 percent of the votes Saturday during the state GOP convention at Foxwoods Casino. The next closest was former Trumbull First Selectman Tim Herbst, with nearly 19 percent. The first to win more than 50 percent will be the party's endorsed candidate.

Two candidates - Stamford Chief Financial Officer Michael Handler and Glastonbury state Rep. Prasad Srinivasan - didn't not receive enough support to progress to the second round.

Ultimately, anyone who wins over 15 percent of the delegates will be qualified to participate in the Aug. 14 primary.

Two candidates not nominated Saturday are collecting signatures to petition their way onto the ballot.

2:15 p.m.

Connecticut Republicans have begun the process of endorsing a candidate for governor.

The more than 1,000 delegates have plenty of candidates to choose from at Saturday's state GOP convention at Foxwoods Casino.

The names of eight candidates were placed in nomination. Candidates David Stemerman and Bob Stefanowski were not nominated at the two-day event because they've decided to collect the approximate 9,600 signatures needed to appear on the August 14 primary ballot.

Other candidates also may attempt to collect signatures.

A large pool of Republican and Democratic gubernatorial candidates has developed this year after Democratic Gov. Dannel P. Malloy announced he would not seek a third term.

Noon

Republicans are backing a retired investment officer as the party's candidate for treasurer, following a close battle for the endorsement.

Thaddeus "Thad" Gray of Salisbury on Saturday narrowly defeated Republican state Sen. Art Linares of Westbrook by roughly 20 delegate votes on the second day of the Republican state convention. Linares has enough support, however, to qualify for the Sept. 14 primary.

Republicans are hoping to win a seat that's been held for years by Democratic state Treasurer Denise Nappier, who is not seeking re-election.

Gray says the GOP has "a unique opportunity" in this election to make Connecticut a place that's "affordable and prosperous for everyone." He also is reaching out to state employees, whose pension funds the state treasurer invests. He says "the Democrats have failed you."

10:15 a.m.

Connecticut Republicans are gathering for a second consecutive day to finish endorsing their slate of candidates for the November elections, including the hotly contested race for governor.

The GOP on Saturday backed Seymour First Selectman Kurt Miller for state comptroller, but Litchfield businessman Mark Greenberg received enough delegate support to participate in the Aug. 14 primary.

Miller says he hopes Greenberg, the 2014 5th congressional district candidate, will decide not to wage a primary challenge. He says it's important for the Republican Party to quickly coalesce and focus on "the destructive financial policies the Democrats have put forward."

The crowded races for governor and lieutenant governor are the main attraction at Saturday's convention, which is being held at Foxwoods Resort Casino. Democratic Gov. Dannel P. Malloy is not seeking re-election.

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