Hurricane season begins today - WFSB 3 Connecticut

Hurricane season begins today

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(NOAA) (NOAA)
(NOAA) (NOAA)
(WFSB) -

The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season officially got underway on Friday.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released its predictions last week, along with the names.

Alberto has come and gone, but here is the list of names for this year's storms:

  • Alberto
  • Beryl
  • Chris
  • Debby
  • Ernesto
  • Florence
  • Gordon
  • Helene
  • Isaac
  • Joyce
  • Kirk
  • Leslie
  • Michael
  • Nadine
  • Oscar
  • Patty
  • Rafael
  • Sara
  • Tony
  • Valerie
  • William

The NOAA forecasted a 75-percent chance that the season will be near or above normal.

It also predicted a 35 percent chance of an above-normal season, a 40-percent chance of a near-normal season and a 25 percent chance of a below-normal season.

“With the advances made in hardware and computing over the course of the last year, the ability of NOAA scientists to both predict the path of storms and warn Americans who may find themselves in harm’s way is unprecedented,” said Wilbur Ross, secretary of commerce. “The devastating hurricane season of 2017 demonstrated the necessity for prompt and accurate hurricane forecasts."

The NOAA predicted a 70 percent likelihood of 10 to 16 named storms, storms that have winds of 39 mph or higher. Five to nine of them could become hurricanes, with winds of 74 mph or higher. One to four could be major hurricanes.

An average hurricane season produces 12 named storms, six of which become hurricanes, including three major hurricanes.

“NOAA’s observational and modeling enhancements for the 2018 season put us on the path to deliver the world’s best regional and global weather models,” said Neil Jacobs, Ph.D., assistant secretary of commerce for environmental observation and prediction. “These upgrades are key to improving hurricane track and intensity forecasts, allowing NOAA to deliver the best science and service to the nation.”

For more on the 2018 hurricane season from the NOAA, read here.

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