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CT officials react, plead for changes as country reels from TX school shooting

State leaders continue to push to strengthen CT gun laws
Published: May. 25, 2022 at 6:44 AM EDT|Updated: May. 25, 2022 at 12:26 PM EDT
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HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) - The country was still in shock Wednesday after Tuesday’s mass school shooting in Uvalde, TX during which at least 21 deaths were reported at a school.

Gov. Ned Lamont participated in a news conference at 11 a.m. during which he spoke about gun violence and the need for strong gun laws.

Gov. Ned Lamont held a news conference to address gun violence in the country.

The Connecticut State Police issued a statement on Wednesday morning.

Many state lawmakers made pleas to one another to act.

At the state capitol, flags flew at half staff to honor the Robb Elementary School victims, 19 of whom were children and two were adults.

“We clearly have a gun problem in America,” Lamont said in a statement on Tuesday. “There are more damn guns on the street than ever before, especially illegal guns. We must test our capacity as a nation in this moment to strengthen public safety and health. I want to be clear — gun violence is a public health crisis. It is incumbent upon lawmakers everywhere, whether it’s Connecticut, Texas, or our nation’s capital, to rise to the moment in addressing this problem.”

Lawmakers joined Connecticut families in calling for action they believe will prevent yet another mass tragedy.

This latest devastating loss of life was the 27th school shooting so far this year in the U.S. It came just 10 days after a gunman opened fire in a Buffalo grocery store and left 10 people dead.

Sen. Chris Murphy condemned some Republican lawmakers over their inaction and resistance to gun control measures.

The shooting in Texas shared eerie similarities to the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Connecticut which left 26 students and staff dead.

Many lawmakers urged their peers to reevaluate how they’ve voted before.

Rep. John Larson released a statement.

“The House [of Representatives] has voted to pass commonsense gun violence prevention measures,” Larson said. “The Senate won’t even dignify these tragedies with a vote on the issue itself. Mitch McConnell and Senate Republicans continue to hide behind the cloture vote and use the filibuster to protect the NRA’s interests. It is time to vote on this issue and bring commonsense gun violence prevention measures to the floor.”

Other lawmakers, as they’ve asked before, wondered when enough will be enough.

After Sandy Hook, Conn. banned many assault style weapons and large ammunition magazines. More recently lawmakers passed Ethan’s Law, which requires all guns to be secured loaded and unloaded it was named after Kristen Song’s son who accidentally shot himself

“I’m here on this floor to beg, to literally get down on my hands and knees and beg my colleagues: Find a path forward here,” said Sen. Chris Murphy on the Senate floor Tuesday. “Work with us to find a way to pass laws that make this less likely. I understand my Republican colleagues will not agree to everything that I may support, but there is a common denominator that we can find.”

This year, to get guns off the streets, Governor Lamont pushed for a gun tracing task force, violence intervention, a crackdown on ghost guns and closing loopholes in assault weapon laws.

Many Democratic lawmakers said they are still pushing for more intense background checks to purchase firearms and other gun control measures.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal said it was Congress’s job to vote.

“It’s how we change this gut-wrenching, heartbreaking status quo,” Blumenthal said. “Inaction is complicity.”

Republican Gubernatorial candidate Bob Stefanowski released a statement Wednesday afternoon:

CT Lawmakers urge Congress to act after Texas school shooting
Lawmakers joined Connecticut families in calling for action they believe will prevent yet another mass tragedy.
In Connecticut, many lawmakers made pleas to one another to act.