Summer program at Quinnipiac University helps high schoolers get real-world experience

The two-week summer program is one of four at QU that is funded through an $8 million state grant designed to help kids combat COVID-related learning loss.
Published: Jul. 4, 2022 at 6:27 PM EDT
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HAMDEN, CT (WFSB) – Summer school may not sound like a lot of fun, but professors at Quinnipiac University are turning the concept on its head and helping students combat learning loss tied to the pandemic.

Gifted high school students from Connecticut and all over the country earned slots at Quinnipiac’s Entrepreneurship and Strategy summer program.

“When I saw this I got really excited, finally somebody to teach me who has experience,” said Matthew Jeanty, high school student.

Jeanty and dozens of other students are getting hands on experience learning how to create and build their own businesses from experts like Entrepreneurship Professor David Tomczyk.

This experience was born out of a difficult situation: the pandemic.

The two-week summer program is one of four at QU that is funded through an $8 million state grant designed to help kids combat COVID-related learning loss.

“It’s part of a larger initiative to help students not just catch up but even accelerate their opportunities when it comes to education and knowing what they want to do as a degree,” said David Charron, Quinnipiac University’s Director of Summer Programs.

Charron said the initiative focuses on helping students disproportionately affected by the pandemic.

Many families don’t pay a penny for a program students like Zack Pronsky call priceless.

“I feel like this is the stuff that they don’t really talk about in school and they don’t emphasize the importance of it,” said Pronsky. “When you get in the real world you are gonna use all this stuff and have all this knowledge.”

“It’s not like a lecture it’s always everyone working together and keeping things interesting,” Jeanty said.

All of the programs, which also include media production, data science, and healthcare are designed to go far beyond simply replacing what students lost during the pandemic.

One of the biggest goals is to build confidence.

“Through the support from the state and our administration we’ve been able to put forth these two-week intensive experiences where students can see not just I think I can - I really can,” said Charron.