(WFSB) -- So far this year, there have been three police involved shootings in the state.

Video from two of them have been released, and it is shown that tasers were used in both of those cases, yet police ultimately used their guns.

“When electronic defense weapons first came on the market, the idea was that they would be used to replace lethal force. I think that was sort of a misnomer,” said Ken Barone, of the Institute for Regional and Municipal Policy.

One case was in West Haven after 19-year-old Mubarak Soulemane led police on a chase on I-95.

RELATED: State police release video of officer-involved shooting that killed teen

The other was in Ansonia, where 30-year-old Michael Gregory charged at officers with a knife.

RELATED: Police release body cam footage from Ansonia officer-involved shooting

In both cases, police ended up shooting the suspects with guns, killing them.

In 2015, Connecticut became the first state in the country to collect data on taser usage. It remains the only state to do it.

Barone is in charge of analyzing the numbers, explaining he looks at “how many times a taser was used in an incident, for how long, how many seconds.”

Data shows tasers deployed via prongs, or dry stuns, happen on average 285 times a year.

“The idea is that the taser should make the person immobile, unable to move,” Barone said.

So, in the two cases that started the year, many question why the tasers didn’t immediately immobilize the suspect.

In the Ansonia case, six seconds elapsed, and Gregory appeared unfazed after the taser was deployed.

“You hear the taser, see the taser, you know it was deployed, and you know because he didn’t stop and continued toward the officer with a weapon, that it didn’t work,” Barone said.

In the West Haven case, you can see and hear in the video the taser being deployed, but how it impacts the suspect is unclear.

“It all happens very quickly. Did the taser get deployed, did it hit the subject, how much time between the taser being deployed and the first shots were fired are all questions that hopefully investigators in the West Haven case are exploring,” Barone said.

When police shoot tasers, they’re trained to aim for center mass, and even when police place it right where they want it, there are many factors that can impact how a suspect reacts.

“Tasers will impact people differently, based on their height, weight, whether or not they were intoxicated or under the influence of drugs,” Barone said.

Also, the clothes they’re wearing.

“If they’re wearing a big bulky coat, it’s likely not going to impact me the same way as if I was only wearing a t-shirt,” Barone explained.

Channel 3 reached out to Ansonia police and the Connecticut State Police for a comment on the effectiveness of their tasers in these incidents.

Ansonia said they can’t comment on the Myrtle Avenue case, but in general, they said “tasers have limitations and are not infallible.”

Channel 3 also asked for the model numbers of the taser used. Ansonia uses the x26p, which has been proven to be less powerful than previous versions. State police didn’t respond.

“There’s different models of tasers. How much of a shock it can deliver, for how long,” Barone said.

Ultimately, experts said they’ve seen tasers replace pepper spray and batons when subduing a subject, but its place and importance in an officer’s arsenal is still a grey area.

“The question is still out on how effective tool they are from a research perspective,” Barone said.

Something that will help research going forward is a law that just went into effect at the beginning of the month. Police now need to report every use of force incident, not just tasers. This information will help paint a clearer picture of what happens after a taser is deployed and how often police take the next step of firing their guns.

Copyright 2020 WFSB (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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