GLASTONBURY, CT (WFSB) - Recent car thefts and vehicle break-ins by young people will be the topic of a community-driven meeting in Glastonbury on Wednesday.

The group Safe Streets Connecticut scheduled the community meeting for Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m. to discuss the issue

Recent car thefts and vehicle break-ins by young people will be the topic of a community-driven meeting in Glastonbury on Wednesday.

The group has about 1,200 members.

The meeting is open to anyone in the state. Residents don’t have to be from Glastonbury.

The group wants to find solutions and encourage lawmakers to take more action.

"I think there has been a level in the brazenness," said Cheshire police Chief Neil Dryfe.

There have been growing calls to crack down on juvenile crime.

More police departments are seeing an increase in car thefts and vehicle break-ins.

The judicial department recently made some changes by making it easier for police to access criminal records on weekends and nights. That can help law enforcement detain juvenile suspects.

However, many want lawmakers to take more action.

"That's what safe streets wants in the special session," said John Porriello, Safe Streets. "This issue can't wait another day."

The surge in juvenile crime has prompted the Cheshire Police Department to partner up with Southington and create a task force. While police cannot legally chase vehicles, they can try to catch suspects afterwards.

"If a credit card or a wallet was in the car and the card was being used somewhere, you can go to a store and get video," Dryfe said. "Certainly it's been a problem in our area, but again across the state.”

“My home was broken into and my vehicles were rifled through," one Glastonbury resident noted.

Recent car thefts and vehicle break-ins by young people will be the topic of a community-driven meeting in Glastonbury on Wednesday.

One Glastonbury mother is one of many victims and what happened to her family has made her so afraid, she didn’t want to reveal her identity.

“I have three teenagers who were home at the time and they come and go, and I am very grateful they were in the home and not out in my garage or driveway at the time these five criminal descended upon my property," she explained.

No matter what community, crime is happening and more of the suspects are teenagers.

Data from the State Police shows an increase in juvenile car thefts. In 2010, 21% and in 2019, it jumped to 36%.

“Repeat offenses need to be dealt with in a harsher manner," Rep. Craig Fishbein said.

“I do think we will be pursuing additional legislation during the general session," Rep. Matt Blumenthal says.

That’s months away and little comfort in light of what’s happening, car thefts, crashes, a woman being shot at outside her home, and women being beaten and kidnapped from their car.

At this point, it’s looking unlikely that legislative leaders will address juvenile crime during a special session.

A group called Safe Streets Connecticut planned a community meeting on Wednesday night to talk about juvenile car thefts and burglaries.

Wednesday night's meeting is at the Glastonbury Riverfront Community Center.

Copyright 2019 WFSB (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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(2) comments

Wellduh

Remember when I said they'd keep talking about it, but have no actionable items? The current leadership in the country and state has demonized and hamstrung it's police all over. "While police cannot legally chase vehicles, they can try to catch suspects afterward"...this is why your cities burn and crime is on the rise. It's on you to protect your family, no help is coming.

Brian C. Duffy

Anecdotal. Crime was much higher from the mid 1960s thru the mid 1990s. Crime is a young man's game. We boomers are the largest generation and we were the criminals then. Now we're too old to outrun the cops. If there was internet and cable back in the 60s, the parents never would have let us out of the house.

Now take off your mask and "bother me"

Brian Duffy ~~ Tariffville, CT

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