CONNECTICUT (WFSB) -- If you were outside around 5:30 a.m. on Thursday, you probably noticed it was a little darker than usual.

From sunrise to about 6:30 a.m., the sun was partially blocked by the moon, creating a solar eclipse.

If you were outside around 5:30 a.m. on Thursday, you probably noticed it was a little darker than usual.

The last solar eclipse in the U.S. was in 2017, where the sun was totally blocked from Oregon to South Carolina over a narrow 7-mile swath.

Thursday’s partial solar eclipse required waking up super early. Plus, the full eclipse was only visible from Ontario to Siberia, so this one was a little less famous than the one in 2017.

The only safe way to view a partial eclipse is with special glasses or watching it on a screen.

In the desert, the temperature can fall as much as 20 degrees during a total solar eclipse.

Animals can start to change their behavior during an eclipse too.

A partial solar eclipse was recorded on Thursday morning by NASA.

Given the time of day and humidity on Thursday, the partial solar eclipse had virtually no impact on our weather or wildlife in Connecticut.

“They had some views from New Britain that were showing the eclipse which I thought was pretty remarkable,” said eclipse enthusiast Jerry Stavola.

The next full solar eclipse in our region is in 2024.

Copyright 2021 WFSB (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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