A winter chill tomorrow... then, after some drier weather, another storm system moves in over the weekend!

STORM RECAP...

The storm system played out according to script. Rain totals across CT ranged from 0.5 to 1.0″, with some locally higher amounts. With the exception of Madison with a gust of 63mph, the wind peaked between 40 and 50 mph. Temperatures topped out between 55 and 60 statewide.

TONIGHT…

The rain is over and the worst of the wind is behind us. Clouds clear and the intensity of the wind decreases behind a potent cold front. Out of the northwest, cooler air moves into CT. By daybreak, expect temps in the upper 20s and lower 30s. The wind, however, will make it feel chillier.

THE REST OF THE WEEK…

After today’s wet and windy weather, outside of some flurries in the NW Hills, December starts on a dry and brighter note. Behind that cold front, it will also be much cooler with highs between 40 and 45. The northwesterly wind will remain up, gusting 25-35 mph. Throughout the day, expect wind chill values to be in the 20s and 30s!

Friday, we end the week under ample sunshine as high pressure builds into the region; this also means the wind will be much calmer. Temperatures peak at seasonable levels, in the mid-40s.

THE WEEKEND…

The weekend forecast remains on track, with a similar pattern to what we just experienced as another system brings wet, windy, and mild weather to Connecticut. Saturday will be cloudy with rain becoming likely, as a southerly wind intensifies 50° warmth can be expected. In the wake of a cold front, Sunday is bright and breezy, but cooler with highs in the 40s.

NEXT WEEK…

The active, repetitive pattern continues into next week. Monday is dry with temps back to near 50. Clouds increase Tuesday in advance of another storm system heading our way that brings showers later in the day.

Chief Meteorologist Mark Dixon

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OUR RECENT STRETCH OF RECORD WARMTH…

The Hartford Area record high (as measured at Bradley Airport) for Saturday (11.05) was broken by 2 degrees as the temp hit 78, prior record was 76 from 1994. For Sunday (11.06), the record of 76 from 2015 was tied. For Bridgeport, the record high for Saturday was 72 (from 1961), it was surpassed by 1 degree. For Sunday the record was 71 (from 2015), it was also broken by 1 degree.

Monday, the 7th of November, the temp for Hartford fell short by 1 degree of the record (the high of 79 from 2020 will stand). Meanwhile, the Bridgeport record was smashed by 10 degrees with a high of 79 (prior record of 69 was from 2020). The high of 79 also makes November 7th, 2022 the warmest November day on record for Bridgeport (records go back to 1948).

The Hartford Area also officially had 8 days at or above 70° in November, breaking the old record of 7 days in both 2020 and 1975.

HISTORY AND CRITERIA FOR NAMING WINTER STORMS…

We are officially releasing our list of Winter Storm names for the ‘22-’23 season. To coincide with the 65th anniversary of the station, our theme for this winter is to use the top baby names of 1957 – the year WFSB first went on the air. Here are the first 5: Anthony, Brenda, Charles, Debra, and Edward.

WFSB/Channel 3 for over 50 years has been naming winter storms, a tradition we’re proud to carry on today. You may remember Blizzard Larry (the Blizzard of ‘78), the big ice storm of December 1973 named Felix, Storm Alfred in late October of 2011 and Blizzard Charlotte in 2013. Alfred’s heavy, wet snow caused a record power outage in Connecticut and Blizzard Charlotte dumped up to 40″ of snow in parts of the state. It all began in 1971 with Channel 3 and the Travelers Weather Service.

Why did we decide to name storms so long ago? Because people easily remember names, especially the ones that have been attached to Connecticut’s biggest storms! Occasionally, we get criticized for naming winter storms, but by far most of our viewers love the tradition and find it fun! Certain criteria must be met for a storm to be named. We must be forecasting at least 6″ of snow for most of the state and/or at least ½” of ice accretion that would occur during an ice storm.

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THANKSGIVING EXTREMES...

With records back to 1905 for the Hartford area, we have a good deal of data to go through! Thank you to our partners at NWS Boston for taking on the arduous task of going through all of the data.

Warmest: 69° for the high, 1933

Coldest: 9° for the low, 2018

Wettest: 1.56″, 1971

Snowiest: 7.6″, 1971

Thanksgiving 2022 went down as about normal. That’s great news, because that means it was an easy day for travel and a great day for spending time with family!

NOVEMBER…

On the 1st of the month, our normal low is 37 and normal high is 57. By the 30th, they go to 29 and 46, respectively. This month, we lose 58 minutes of daylight. Then another 16 minutes in December. Once we get past the winter solstice on December 21st (in 49 days), we start gaining day light!

OCTOBER SUMMARY…

The 10th month of the year was warmer and wetter, compared to normal. The average temperature for the 31-day period was 53.9 degrees (0.9 degrees above normal). At Bradley Airport, where the official records are kept, 5.03″ of rain was measured (0.51″ above normal).

METEOROLOGICAL SUMMER…

August went down in the books as the warmest on record with an average temperature of 76.8 degrees (records date back to 1905). For meteorological summer (June, July, August), the average temperature comes in at 74.2 degrees --- making the 3-month period the 3rd warmest on record.

2022 HEAT WAVES, RECORDS…

This year we experienced 2 heat waves. The 1st lasted 6 days, from July 19th to the 24th. The peak temp was 97 on the 20th. Our 2nd heat wave lasted 8 days, from August 2nd to the 9th with a peak temp of 96 on August 4th and 7th.

From June 28th through August 12th, every day featured a high temperature at or above 80 in the Hartford Area. This year’s stretch of 46 days in a row broke the prior record of 44 days from 2018.